Heart Attack - CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Health System

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Heart Attack (AMI)

A heart attack (also called an acute myocardial infarction or AMI) happens  when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. When the heart muscle can't get the oxygen and nutrients it needs, the heart tissue that is affected may die. Studies have shown the most crucial element affecting the survival of patients having a heart attack is how quickly the arteries of the heart are re-opened.

If you are experiencing symptoms of a heart attack:

Man with chest pains

Call 911 immediately and ask EMS to take you to the Chest Pain Center at CHRISTUS Mother Frances Hospital.

Heart attacks can occur with little warning, and getting to emergency care is vital to your recovery.

Rapid response and diagnosis

When a heart attack happens, every minute matters. Rapid response can mean the difference between permanent heart muscle damage with limited recovery or even death, and complete recovery with a quick return to an active life. CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Health System has invested significant resources into equipping and training our skilled staff to provide effective, efficient diagnoses and treatment.

The Chest Pain Center, designed exclusively to care for patients experiencing heart attack symptoms, is a fast-track, user-friendly facility equipped with the nation’s most advanced cardiac monitoring system. The skilled cardiac care team on-duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week, is trained to recognize early symptoms and begin immediate treatment. The Chest Pain Center at CHRISTUS Mother Frances Hospital remains the region's first and most active nationally accredited chest pain center.

Time is muscle

Studies have shown the most crucial element affecting the survival of patients having a heart attack is how quickly the arteries of the heart are re-opened. The time between emergency transport of an acute heart attack patient and a life-saving heart catheterization to open up the blockage is critical. This block of time is known as “door-to-balloon.”

Learn more about acute myocardial infarction 

Hypothermia (Code COOL)

Mild hypothermia is the only therapy applied in the post-cardiac arrest setting that has been shown to increase survival rates and was noted in the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support Guidelines.

The physicians at the Louis & Peaches Owen Heart Hospital have had great success with this protocol and apply the therapy when deemed necessary. The guidelines identified the need for cooling to occur in the pre-hospital arena, noting that hypothermia should probably be initiated as soon as possible after Return of Spontaneous Circulation.

Learn more about Code COOL from the American Heart Association.

Heart Risk Assessment

Take our free Heart Risk Assessment to find out if you're at risk for heart disease.

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