January 20 2006 - NEW CARDIAC DEVICE AT TRINITY MOTHER FRANCES HEART INSTITUTE

Press Release - January 20, 2006
NEW CARDIAC DEVICE AT TRINITY MOTHER FRANCES HEART INSTITUTE

 

For Immediate Release

January 20, 2006

Contact:
John Moore
Media Relations
(903) 531-4542

NEW TECHNIQUE AT TRINITY MOTHER FRANCES HEART INSTITUTE FIXES HOLE IN THE HEART

Device Can Repair Heart Without Open-Heart Surgery

TYLER, TX – CardioSEAL®, a device that works like two tiny spring-loaded umbrellas to cover a hole in the heart, is now being used by a local cardiologist to benefit patients at the Trinity Mother Frances Heart Institute, part of the Center for Advanced Surgery and Technology (CASAT). David A. Hector, II, MD, of Tyler Cardiovascular Consultants, PA, used the device for the first time today to help three patients from East Texas. All three patients suffered from a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA) and have a patent foramen ovalae (PFO), which is a hole in the heart between the right and left atrium that can cause embolic stroke in some patients.

CardioSEAL, which is manufactured in Boston by NMT Medical, Inc., fits in a catheter that is threaded through veins to reach the heart. Once in position, it is opened and covers both sides of the hole in the heart.

"This device, which can be inserted into the heart without doing open heart surgery, can help reduce the risk of stroke in PFO patients," said Dr. Hector. “PFO patients tend to be at an increased risk of embolic stroke so this device can save lives. I am very excited to offer it to my patients at the Trinity Mother Frances Heart Institute.”

“CardioSEAL is a great addition to the many cardiac advancements we have available to our patients,” said Michael J. Vintges, vice president, Trinity Mother Frances Heart Institute. “By combing our technologies, including cardiac robotic surgery and the Stereotaxis cardiac catheterization suites, new facilities, cardiovascular research, and highly rated customer service, we have the most comprehensive cardiology program in Texas. Dr. Hector and all of the fine physicians at Tyler Cardiovascular Consultants share our goal of looking for the latest cutting-edge treatments that can offer patients less pain and a faster recovery.”

In certain children and adults with PFO, a blood clot that enters the right atrium may travel to the left atrium through the opening and then to the brain. The CardioSEAL helps close the opening in the heart and may prevent a future stroke and eliminate the need for ongoing potent blood thinning medication that can be necessary in some PFO patients.

The device is delivered to the heart by way of a catheter and inserted in the groin or neck and threaded through the veins to the heart. The physician watches the insertion on an x-ray monitor and by intracardiac echocardiogram and positions the CardioSEAL. The device is then released over the opening. In the months that follow the procedure, tissue will grow over the fabric to permanently become part of the heart muscle.

The catheterization procedure takes approximately 20 minutes, during which time the patient is monitored by intracardiac echocardiography. Each patient is kept overnight in the hospital and given another echo exam the next day to check that the hole has closed properly.

"In approximately six months, the device will become one with the heart,” added Dr. Hector. “Other than taking aspirin, most patients will not have to return to taking blood thinners such as Coumadin, and the risk of stroke is substantially reduced.”

For more information on the Trinity Mother Frances Heart Institute or additional services available through Trinity Mother Frances Health System, visit www.tmfhs.org.

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